?>?> April News: INFLATION – SET POVERTY — Hope Ofiriha

April News: INFLATION – SET POVERTY

Waiting_schoofees_staying _homeOur hearts go to South Sudanese Refugee children stranded in Kampala and has no possibility to study due to poverty. Please consider giving $35 to send a child to a boarding school in Uganda for 30 days – through our tax deductible partner GlobalGiving. Your donation will combine with other gifts to make a tremendous impact! <Send A child to school for a month!>

Without opportunities, the poor often become bound to their dire circumstances – helpless and defenseless to escape the harsh realities of their surroundings. In Eastern African newest nation of South Sudan, many poor families live in a grim world where they see little hope for change. Most are victims of inherited poverty, and their futures are stunted and bleak.

Not only do South Sudan’s needy face the cyclical trap of poverty, but their families are often torn apart by HIV/AIDs and war. In recent decades, millions of children have lost one or both parents to disease and civil conflicts.

Abandoned, they are left to fend for themselves, the oldest siblings often becoming the head of the household – a responsibility he or she is ill-equipped to handle financially, and mentally. Even those children who have an extra parent or guardian are sometimes neglected or abused.

In other cases, the parent or guardian does not have the financial means to provide for regular meals, much less educational expenses. These vulnerable children, like the orphans, see their chances of returning to school dim a little with each passing day.  Eventually, most lose hope of being lifted out of their plight through the opportunities an education might have provided.

Although the government in South Sudan operates on the universal school system, meaning all children should be able to attend school at no cost, demand greatly outweighs the country’s supply of facilities. It is not unusual for classes to have more 100 students, and scarce materials and equipment often produce discouraged, overworked teachers.

Private schools could provide an ideal alternative, the costs remain a roadblock. Poor families are scraping by on less than a dollar a day need outside help to relieve them and rescue their children from this terrible situation.

 

 

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